Tag Archives: Vertigo (film)

The Wrong Man

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by Uncredited: Alfred Hitchcock
Written by Story: Maxwell Anderson
The True Story of Christopher Emmanuel Balestrero
Screenplay: Maxwell Anderson & Angus MacPhail
Starring
Henry Fonda
Vera Miles
Anthony Quayle
Harold Stone
Music by Bernard Herrmann
Cinematography Robert Burks
Editing by George Tomasini
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) December 22, 1957 (U.S.)
Running time 105 minutes
Country United States
Language English

This is Alfred Hitchcock speaking. In the past, I have given you many kinds of suspense pictures. But this time, I would like you to see a different one. The difference lies in the fact that this is a true story, every word of it. And yet it contains elements that are stranger than all the fiction that has gone into many of the thrillers that I’ve made before.

Hitchcock’s cameo in The Wrong Man is the easiest one of all to stop as here he appears in silhouette and addresses the audience directly, to let the audience know that they are about to see a story based on the real experience of one man, Manny Balestrero, who was wrongly accused of committing a number of robberies.

This film is probably one of the least known of Hitch’s movies, especially when compared to his other 50s films such as Vertigo, North By Northwest, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Rear Window and Dial M For Murder, which were all made in the five-year from 1954-1959. However this is a very good film due mainly to the performance of Henry Fonda, as the man arrested and put on trial for crimes committed by a lookalike, and Vera Miles as his wife who is driven mad because of the incident. I really enjoyed their performances greatly.

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The Trouble With Harry

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by Uncredited: Alfred Hitchcock
Written by Novel: Jack Trevor Story
Screenplay: John Michael Hayes
Starring: Edmund Gwenn
John Forsythe
Shirley MacLaine
Mildred Natwick
Mildred Dunnock
Jerry Mathers
Royal Dano
Music by Bernard Herrmann
Cinematography: Robert Burks
Editing by Alma Macrorie
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release date October 3, 1955
Running time 99 min
Country United States
Language English

Alfred Hitchcock’s The Trouble With Harry is a departure from Hitch’s usual suspense genre. Instead it is a very funny black comedy involving a dead body that just can’t stay buried. I know that this makes it sound a little bit like Weekend At Bernie’s but trust me, The Trouble With Harry is a much more clever film.

There are lots of clever and funny dialogue spread throughout the film, much of it very risqué for 1955 when the film was released. The cast is very likeable, especially like Edmund Gwenn’s as Captain Wiles and Shirley MacLaine (in her movie debut) as Jennifer.

The plot revolves around Harry, whose dead body is found by Captain Wiles who assumes that he had accidentally shot the poor unfortunate fellow. In fact three of the main characters in the films also believe that they are responsible for Harry’s untimely demise until… well if I told you about how Harry really died it would wreck the film for you!

The musical score by Bernard Herrmann is also very good and John Forsythe sings a song written by Raymond Scott, who was best known for composing Powerhouse, which was featured in many Warner Bros. cartoons.

The film was not a big financial success for Hitchcock when released in America but was extremely popular in Britain, Italy and France. After its initial release it remained locked away for thirty years, until it was released onto video in the 1980s. It is perhaps for this reason it is not as widely known as Hitch’s other films of this period such as Vertigo, Rear Window and North By Northwest.