Tag Archives: Orson Welles

History Of The World – Part 1

Directed by Mel Brooks
Produced by Mel Brooks
Written by Mel Brooks
Narrated by Orson Welles
Starring Mel Brooks
Dom DeLuise
Madeline Kahn
Harvey Korman
Cloris Leachman
Music by John Morris
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release date June 12, 1981
Running time 92 min.
Country United States
Language English

“It’s good to be the king”

Mel Brooks’ History of the World Part 1 is quite funny but it isn’t anywhere as good as Young Frankenstein, Blazing Saddles or The Producers. It’s probably a  little more hit and miss than those other films but it is I feel, a lot better than High Anxiety.
For some reason I used to love this movies as a kid. I watched it a few times and thought it was hilarious. Watching it as an adult I find that it’s not as great as I thought when I was a kid, but there are still a few chuckles to be had.

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You Can’t Cheat An Honest Man

Directed by George Marshall
Edward F. Cline (uncredited)
Produced by Lester Cowan
Written by W. C. Fields (as “Charles Bogle”) (story)
Everett Freeman (screenplay)
Richard Mack (screenplay)
George Marion Jr. (screenplay)
Starring W. C. Fields
Edgar Bergen
Charlie McCarthy
Cinematography Milton R. Krasner
Editing by Otto Ludwig
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date February 18, 1939
Running Time 76 min.

This was quite a good W. C Fields comedy film. It features a lot of classic lines from Fields, as well as some good slapstick pratfalls, but also features a continuation of his wonderful rivalry with a ventriloquists’ puppet.

It’s a bit hard to explain but for many years Fields had a radio rivalry with Charlie McCarthy, Edgar Bergen’s (Candice’s father) dummy. It’s strange indeed to think of someone doing a ventriloquist act on the radio, but that is where this funny rivalry was created. Both Fields and Bergen have some great moments to themselves in the brief moments when they are in a scene together there is some really good chemistry and funny jokes.

You Can’t Cheat An Honest Man is a part of the W.C. Fields Comedy Collection with The Bank Dick, My Little ChickadeeInternational House and It’s A Gift. This DVD box set is available from Amazon for $46.99. You can purchase it by clicking here…


The 3rd Man

Directed by Carol Reed
Produced by Carol Reed
Uncredited: Alexander Korda & David O. Selznick
Written by Graham Greene
Starring: Joseph Cotten
Alida Valli
Orson Welles
Trevor Howard
Music by Anton Karas
Cinematography: Robert Krasker
Editing by Oswald Hafenrichter
Distributed by British Lion Films (UK),
Selznick International Pictures (US)
Release date(s) 2 September 1949 (UK)
2 January 1950 (US)
Running time: 104 minutes
Country: United Kingdom

Holly, I’d like to cut you in, old man. There’s nobody left in Vienna I can really trust, and we’ve always done everything together. When you make up your mind, send me a message – I’ll meet you any place, any time, and when we do meet old man, it’s you I want to see, not the police. Remember that, won’t ya? Don’t be so gloomy. After all it’s not that awful. Remember what the fella said: In Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love – they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock. So long Holly.

Just who is Harry Lime? Is he the man who was your best friend for twenty years and who you think you know so well, or is he a racketeer and murderer? Orson Welles’ Harry Lime is central to The Third Man even though he doesn’t appear until after the sixty minute mark of the film. This is a truly great film of mystery and intrigue set in post WWII Vienna.

Harry Lime is dead but no one is sure of the exact circumstances of his death. It is said he was hit by a truck and was carried away by two men, but then his friend Holly Martins hear tales about at third man at the scene, and comes to think that foul play is afoot. Things only become more confusing for Martins after he sets out to solve the mystery and discovers Harry Lime himself, lurking in the shadows. (This is the worst trailer ever made!)

This is really a very enjoyable film that won an Oscar in 1949 for best black & white cinematography, and a BAFTA for best British film.  Carol Reed was nominated for an Academy Award as best director, and was named the 57th greatest film of all time by the American Film institute in 1996, and the #1 British film of all time by the British Film Institute.


Ed Wood

Directed by Tim Burton
Produced by Tim Burton
Denise Di Novi
Written by Screenplay:
Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski
Book:
Rudolph Grey
(Nightmare of Ecstasy)
Starring Johnny Depp
Martin Landau
Patricia Arquette
Sarah Jessica Parker
Jeffrey Jones
Lisa Marie
Bill Murray
Music by Howard Shore
Cinematography Stefan Czapsky
Editing by Chris Lebenzon
Distributed by Touchstone Pictures
Release date(s) Limited release:
September 30, 1994
Wide release
October 7, 1994
Running time 127 min.
Country United States

Edward D. Wood Jr. is world-renowned as having directed some of the worst movies ever made. He was a director with lots of ideas and ambition but little talent or money. Most of the actors he used in his films were made up of friends, freaks and weirdos, as well as a drug addled and past his prime Bela Lugosi. Wood may have had little talent as a director and his films may be ridiculed as some of the worst of all time and they have an ill-conceived weirdness about them, yet they retain a sincerity in them and are never boring, which you cannot necessarily say about some of today’s big budget blockbusters.Despite his lack of talent and success there are very few Hollywood directors who can say that they have had their lives and career lovingly immortalised on film.

Depp is brilliant as Wood, in another of his quirkier roles. He plays Wood as someone full of childish enthusiasm for the movie business, and who doesn’t see his own limitations. He idolizes the great Orson Welles and in his own mind he is just as successful. I know that Burton must have taken a few liberties with the film, but I wonder if Wood honestly knew that what he was making was shit, or is he really thought of himself as an auteur making great works of art. Perhaps this is my own cynical nature that makes me think this, but there is no cynicism at all in Burton’s film. He and Depp portray Wood with all the reverence reserved for legends.

I must also make mention of Martin Landau’s Oscar-winning performance portraying screen legend Bela Lugosi, the original Dracula. He gives a sympathetic portrayal of Lugosi, who at the time he met Wood had hit rock bottom. His career was in tatters and he was in the grips of morphine addiction. A running joke throughout the film is when Ed tells potential backers that he is going to have Lugosi starring in his next movie project the response is usually, “Isn’t he dead?”.

This is a great little film that is very funny and quirky. It is a fascinating look at the life of someone who never knew that he was a failure and never gave up on his dreams.