Tag Archives: Jim Carrey

The Geisha Boy

Directed by Frank Tashlin
Produced by Jerry Lewis
Written by Frank Tashlin & Rudy Makoul
Starring

Jerry Lewis as Gilbert Wooley
Marie McDonald as Lola Livingston
Sessue Hayakawa as Mr. Sikita
Barton MacLane as Major Ridgley
Suzanne Pleshette as Sergeant Pearson
Nobu McCarthy as Kimi Sikita
Robert Hirano as Mitsuo Watanabe
Ryuzo Demura as Ichiyama
The Los Angeles Dodgers as Themselves

    Distributed by Paramount Pictures
    Release date December 23, 1958
    Running time 99 minutes
    Language English

    The Geisha Boy is another of those Jerry Lewis films that I would have watched several times as a kid. It is currently available on DVD for $5 from Big W. It is mildly entertaining, despite a few politically incorrect gags from Jerry. There are a few good gags with Jerry and his rabbit, although these do wear a little thin after the first half an hour of the movie. Thankfully after this point the rabbit jokes are used quite sparingly. The relationship between Jerry and the little Japanese kid is a bit schmalzty and the scene at Tokyo airport paints Jerry as being a huge jerk, but otherwise this is an amusing film that is quite enjoyable.

    I can also see that Jim Carrey stole much of his schtick from Jerry Lewis by watching this film.

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    You Nazty Spy!

    Directed by Jules White
    Produced by Jules White
    Written by Felix Adler
    Starring: Moe Howard
    Larry Fine
    Curly Howard

    Richard Fiske
    Lorna Gray
    Dick Curtis
    Don Beddoe
    Florine Dickson
    Little Billy
    John Tyrrell
    Bert Young
    Joe Murphy
    Eddie Laughton
    Al Thompson
    Distributed by Columbia Pictures
    Release date(s) January 19, 1940
    Running time 17′ 59″
    Country United States
    Language English

    Satire was never the Three Stooges forte, they were known more for their slapstick and poking each other in the eyes, yet their greatest film was a satirical look at World War II that was more biting than anything that Chaplin could do. In fact this film was released nine months before Chaplin’s The Great Dictator! Moe was the first ever actor to spoof Hitler.

    This is a most unusual short when compared to the Stooges other films. I suppose that is because it is quite clever and not as one dimensional as their other movies. I suppose that they were more venomous and serious with their humour because of their Jewish heritage and to make a profound statement about the atrocities happening in Europe at the time.