Daily Archives: August 6, 2010

Updates

I have updated some of the pages at the top of the blog. Currently the Complete List Of Movies list is complete (as well as previewing what I will watch next), as is the list of Duds and list of Silent Films. The list of Alfred Hitchcock films is complete too, with links, as is the list of Foreign Language Films.

Keep watching as more changes and updates will be happening for the next couple of weeks.

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We Want Our Mummy

Directed by Del Lord
Produced by Jules White
Written by Searle Kramer & Elwood Ullman
Starring Moe Howard
Larry Fine
Curly Howard
Dick Curtis
Bud Jamison
James C. Morton
Eddie Laughton
Ted Lorch
Robert Williams
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date February 24, 1939
Running time 16′ 27″
Country USA
Language English

This is just the usual Three Stooges hijinks, this time set in Egypt. I guess if you’re a fan of the Stooges you’d like this and if you’re not you won’t.


M

Directed by Fritz Lang
Produced by Seymour Nebenzal
Written by Fritz Lang, Thea von Harbou, Paul Falkenberg & Adolf Jansen
Starring Peter Lorre
Otto Wernicke
Gustaf Gründgens
Ellen Widmann
Inge Landgut
Theodor Loos
Friedrich Gnass
Music by Edvard Grieg
Cinematography Fritz Arno Wagner
Editing by Paul Falkenberg
Distributed by Vereinigte Star-Film GmbH
Paramount Pictures (US)
Release date Germany: 11 May 1931
United States: 3 May 1933
Running time 117 minutes
99 minutes (US)
Country Germany
Language German

Fritz Lang’s M is an interesting 1931 German film. For much part it seems almost like a silent movie. It wasn’t uncommon for film makers in the late 1920s and early 1930s to add sound elements to what started out as silent movies, Hitchcock did this with Blackmail as did Howard Hughes with Hell’s Angels, as they tried to catch up with the boom in talkies in the aftermath of The Jazz Singer.That said, M has long stretches of silent scenes but as sound, or a particular tune, plays an important part in the picture it must have originally been conceived as a talkie.

The plot concerns the hunt for a serial killer who has been murdering young children. The police have hit a dead-end and have started targeting the criminal underworld in the hope that this will help them find the killer. What it really does is cause the criminals to take matters into their own hands so that they can get the police off their own backs and get back to business.

Peter Lorre is quite impressive as the serial killer even though he really doesn’t do much until near the end of the film when he is on the run from, and subsequently captured by, the underworld. It’s interesting to hear the emotion in his voice when he is pleading for his life and stating that none of his accusers know what it is like to be him.It is worth watching this film for his performance alone.


I Confess

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by Alfred Hitchcock Written by George Tabori
William Archibald
Paul Anthelme (Play)
Starring Montgomery Clift
Anne Baxter
Karl Malden
Brian Aherne
O. E. Hasse
Roger Dann
Dolly Haas
Music by Dimitri Tiomkin
Cinematography Robert Burks
Editing by Rudi Fehr
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date March 22, 1953
Running time 95 minutes
Country United States
Language English

This is a Hitchcock movie where he once again revisits one of his favourite themes of someone being accused of a crime he didn’t commit. It is a theme that he would also look at again in The Wrong Man a few years later. The difference here is that the accused knows who the murderer is but cannot tell the police. The reason for this is that the accused is a priest and the murderer told him about what happened during confession. The murderer ends up framing Father Logan in order to save his own neck, while Father Logan cannot say anything in his own defence. It’s an interesting concept and the film is quite entertaining.

There is also a documentary about the film on the DVD and as usual it features Peter Bogdanovich. I know he’s a well-known director and some of his movies are pretty good, but does he do anything these days other than appearing in documentaries about Hitchcock? He seems to be in every one that I have seen. It’s also the same with when you are watching a documentary on an old horror or sci-fi movie and you hear from Bob Burns, isn’t there anyone else?